I’m thinking about selling my table saw, let’s talk.

Home LIWForum LIW Public Forum I’m thinking about selling my table saw, let’s talk.

This topic contains 12 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Ben Nawrath Ben Nawrath 2 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #4261

    Justin Matranga
    Participant

    Hi. I’m having one of those moments like when Bob Dylan went electric, but in reverse. I’m in the middle of rebuilding my garage and all my stuff is in storage. When I set up shop, I thought a cabinet saw was the ultimate shop tool. Now I’m thinking it’s too big and I very rarely find a reason to clear off the junk that winds up on it.

    I know a lot of people here have years of saw experience and are very attached to their tools and workflow styles. however, for the projects I’m into right now, I find myself more productive and the process more enjoyable when I don’t use the saw.

    Anyway, what are your thoughts.

    Ps It’s a Sawstop so there’s THAT debate as well. Lol

  • #4262

    Bill Leonhardt
    Participant

    This topic has the potential for an interesting discourse. Justin, can you give us an idea of the projects you have in mind for now and the near future? Also, do you have a bandsaw?

  • #4263

    Justin Matranga
    Participant

    I’ve been making chairs and would like to start playing with windsor chairs when I finish the garage. I plan on keeping my bandsaw and lathe. With the bandsaw I can still make rip cuts. Like everyone else, space is always an issue and right now the table saw isn’t earning its keep.

  • #4264

    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Bill’s right, Justin, this topic is one that is open to pages of dialog. That said, to my understanding, many people have abandoned their table saws in favor of a band saw. The latest addition would be a track saw to handle sheet goods and to make precision cuts. Bill also asked the most important question: What type of work will you be doing. We’ve all seen the great chairs you make and the techniques you use. Frankly, I’m surprised the Sawstop is still in your possession. (Too bad I’m not in the market for one.) ALMOST anything you can do on a table saw you can accomplish with a band saw. A router and track saw will fill in any gaps you don’t feel comfortable handling with hand tools. But in your case, I don’t see that as an issue.

  • #4265

    Robert DeMarco
    Participant

    Justin I would be interested in the saw if you decide to sell it . Thanks Rob .

  • #4266

    Justin Matranga
    Participant

    Joe, I agree this is an open ended question. I’ve been hanging on to it thinking I’d use it to make some projects around the house (cabinets and stuff) but when I get shop time I always have something else im working on that seems like more fun. I think a track saw is a great idea for sheet goods. I’ve always liked bringing the tool to the workpiece rather than wrestling a big piece through a stationary machine. Rob, I’ll shoot you an email in a little bit.

  • #4267

    Bill Leonhardt
    Participant

    I’ve been thinking about this all day. Here’s what has occurred to me.

    No one can doubt Justin’s hand tool abilities and can only marvel at the chairs he produces. If he sees himself going in this direction all the time, it would seem pointless for him to house a table saw, especially if he is short on room. If he sells his and then misses it, he can always get another one down the road. Having room in one’s shop is a real “quality of life” issue. Things seem to flow better when you have elbow room.

    I have a table saw. It was a big $ investment, but I have no regrets. Do I use it for every project? Well, yes, but I’m not making chairs (yet). I also spread an old plastic table cloth on the saw and outfeed table and it handles a lot of assembling and finishing chores.

    As I thought about this philosophically, I came to realize that I really like having all the potential the saw brings to my aspirations. Yes I know many (all) of the table saw’s operations can be had with other machines, but, in my fantasies, I feel like I can attempt any woodworking project and I have this “heart of my shop” there to see me through. Even now as I gravitate to more hand tool techniques, I bask in my saw’s potential.

    My shop isn’t spacious, nor is it overly cramped. For now, I am happy to create the space for my saw and all the hutzpah it give me.

  • #4278
    Ben Nawrath
    Ben Nawrath
    Participant

    I think Justin is just mad he didn’t get to split logs in July heat again this year and wants attention.

    You mentioned this at the club the other night, and I hadn’t had a chance to read this thread yet! As to the eternal, international, unending debate over “do I need it”, people tend to focus on what you CAN do on either machine. Yes you can rip on both, and I’d argue, other than rip capacity and non-thru cuts, the band saw is actually more versatile.

    BUT! One thing many people don’t seem to consider is having two machines setup for two different operations at the same time. Like having two routers setup, one with a round-over, one in a table with a dialed-in rabbet setup or something. That’s where it comes in handy to have both.

    That said, for some people it makes sense to have a second, smaller band saw. For others it makes sense to have a small jobsite table saw built into the wing of the cabinet saw. So ultimately, it comes down to your use. Much like the (also eternal, international, and unending) debate over buying the best tool you can afford, sometimes you find out after spending the money you really don’t use it the way you thought you would. We evolve, as do our interests. Like Bill said, you can always get another one. This isn’t a permanent move! And you can’t split logs with it anyway.

  • #4280

    Charlie James
    Participant

    I have 2 bandsaws and a table saw and I use all of them as well as the other power tools in my shop. I happen to like, really like, working with hand tools and try to use them as much as is practicable. For repeat work nothing beats the speed, accuracy and the clean cuts of a table saw. Using the right feed rate and blade it is almost (almost) possible to glue a joint right from the saw. If I had less room I would keep my table saw and ditch the bandsaw, I find it that much more useful for the work I do. Having said that, you can make the same argument for any just about any tool in the shop. It depends on the work you do. It is possible to fell a tree and cut it up into veneer with hand tools but who wants to go back to that? I’d have to dig a pit in my backyard! Every new tool supersedes the one before it and tries to improve on it, time wise mostly. Otherwise people wouldn’t buy them. It’s a personal as well as business choice. Try to sell hand made furniture and you’ll find most people don’t want to pay the prices. Make the same furniture with power tools and it could take a small percentage of the time so you could charge much less and actually make a living…

  • #4284

    Daryl Rosenblatt
    Participant

    I remember giving a talk at one of the Hofstra shows, on setting up shop, and I think I caused a stir when I said if you want to go to power saws, the table saw is a last choice, not a first. I said to go with a bandsaw and tracksaw first. That said, my tablesaw is one I wouldn’t give up for anything, it’s big (12 inch), 5 HP, and has an incredibly precise sliding table..it’s a Felder, and it lets me do things normal table saws can’t. But I still prefer using my bandsaw when possible. It can cut things a tablesaw can’t, and it’s way safer. it also has a much thinner kerf, so there are times when you just get more out of the wood.

    I agree with Charlie, and Jim Tolpin wrote a book on that. Most furniture and cabinetmakers go to power tools because it’s the only way to make a living.

  • #4285

    Justin Matranga
    Participant

    Thanks for all the great discussion, Bill I agree with you that there is a heart of the shop but for me its increasingly my drawknife and shavehorse. Incidentally, I just learned of Jennie Alexander’s passing. She authored the book “Make a Chair from a Tree” and the follow up “Make a Joint Stool from a Tree” with Peter Follansbee. These are the sources for my recent projects and wholesale shift in the way I currently approach woodworking. Its really renewed a passion to create and I’ll be forever grateful for that. The point is that whatever motivates you to get in the shop and make something, be it a table saw or a pit saw, is a win in my book. Whats great about our club is that we have a mix of hobbyists and professionals and a mix of ideas and techniques. I have the luxury of exploring methods in my garage that would be out of place in a production shop. My workshop time doesnt put food on my table so I can mess around all I want. Amateur woodworking can be very unconstrained that way, we can explore history, tools etc and go chasing down any rabbit hole we want. For me, pit sawing a log would be a blast, others not so much (Charlie give me a call AFTER you dig the pit). And Ben, Im over splitting logs in July, tearing down my garage and breaking up concrete is the way to go if you really want beat the heat. My new shop is going to have A/C

  • #4286

    Bill Leonhardt
    Participant

    The forum doesn’t have a “like” button else I’d have to “like” Justin’s post. Double like, actually.

  • #4289
    Ben Nawrath
    Ben Nawrath
    Participant

    You’re officially on for next July :)

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