Wireless/battery sander

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This topic contains 15 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Daryl Rosenblatt 1 month ago.

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  • #4800

    Robert Coles
    Participant

    I have a boat deck to sand. Some 240 ft from any outlet.
    Which solution should I contemplate: new 14ga extension cord(s) or new sander. Same price at the end…
    How long can IO expect to work from one charge ?
    Thank you.

  • #4807

    A possible solution is a battery-powered sander plus a spare battery. One working and one charging… How large is the deck area? Will you be sanding to raw wood or just roughing the current finish to lay on new varnish?

    Larger areas and removing the existing finish all the way to raw wood suggests a more powerful, larger surface sander face and longer run times, in short, a plug in model. When building a new boat, i use up to 6 different sanders, each is specialized for a certain task. If you too have several existing machines, you will probably be better off with extension cords and using your current hardware.

    Battery-powered devices are very useful, but they remain relatively expensive because you will almost certainly need a charger and a spare battery. Moreover, whichever brand you choose will likely be your brand for life since batteries and chargers are generally INCOMPATIBLE across manufacturers.

  • #4808

    Joe Pascucci
    Moderator

    I think that’s too long of a run for 14 ga wire. I don’t think you should use anything less than 12 ga. 10 would even better.

  • #4809

    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Hey Robert!
    Nice to hear from you.
    Did you consider acquiring a small generator for the task and sticking with your current (no pun intended) tools? There are small, very compact generators available that should do the trick. A gallon of gasoline should last you several hours or so. Of course a larger more efficient unit might serve you better. But if it is permitted, even a rental unit should be considered.

    I agree with Joe P. (4 for 4) no less than 12 awg. extension cord, 10 preferred. A battery charger has to be plugged in to work. That’s at least 240 ft. away. Assuming it’s a secure location, you’ll be getting some good exercise exchanging batteries.

  • #4812
    Michael Luciano
    Michael Luciano
    Participant

    Be careful. A long run of cord may drop the voltage too much for some Sanders. Better check the instruction manual, as to the allowed operating voltage for your machine. The voltage drop can be calculated, if necessary.

  • #4813

    Charlie James
    Participant

    Battery operated or a generator as Joe suggested. I’d say 250′ of # 10 Extension cord isn’t economically feasible.

  • #4814

    Of course there is another choice to consider. Paraphrasing Mr. Miyagi, “Finish on, finish off. Finish on, finish off.” Think of life before power tools. No cables; no batteries; no generators; no clouds of dust; minimal expense; great workout.

  • #4815
    Ben Nawrath
    Ben Nawrath
    Participant

    I have a ridgid 18V cordless sander. Overall I like it, definitely one of those “never thought I’d like it” tools. It definitely seems to eat thru batteries quickly. Most likely because all of my other cordless tools are short-burst use, not constant run tools (drills, saw). So it’ll seem to go thru batteries very quickly. It also depends on the size of battery, which changes the weight of the tool a LOT. I chose it because I already have several batteries. So if you already have a set of cordless tools, stick with that platform. Otherwise batteries are super expensive on their own. Just go to home depot in the man-gift section up front. A pair of 18v batteries is like 150 or 160 and a drill/driver set WITH two batteries is 200…

  • #4816

    Daryl Rosenblatt
    Participant

    Hey Robert. First, I agree with Ben, I don’t like the idea of a run that long, I don’t care what the gauge of the extension is. The drop will be enormous, and will also shorten the life of your sander, assuming it will run at all. Joe is right. The best solution is really a pneumatic sander, but there is no way you can run any line that long for a compressor, unless you get a gas powered compressor. If that’s not a good option (can you rent one? Abbey Rent All in Hicksville will have them), then go cordless.

    Also, are you interested in our molding plane workshop in January? Sounds like it’s right up your alley.

  • #4817
    Ben Nawrath
    Ben Nawrath
    Participant

    Ooooo pneumatic is an interesting idea, guess I didn’t read thoroughly enough! I bet you could rent a generator/compressor or something.

  • #4823

    Tom Schneider
    Participant

    If you have a lot of wood to sand, I like the generator idea, if you have one. I don’t think you will be happy with battery powered sander, the batteries won’t last long. I would not worry about the voltage drop too much. If your electric sander draws 7amps and you have 250′ to cover the voltage drop using 14g cord will be nominal (around 8 volts) and won’t affect the tool, 12g cord would have a voltage drop of about 5 volts. this is all assuming you’re starting out with 120v. There are other things to consider like puddles, cars etc…

  • #4825

    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    https://www.harborfreight.com/900-max-starting700-running-watts-2-hp-63cc-2-cycle-gas-generator-epacarb-63025.html

    Robert, if you are still there, here is a link for a 700 watt generator. I have one just like it and it runs nicely. Just install a high performance spark plug (trust me) and it will run great. It’s about 16″ cubed and not too loud.

    Another good alternative may be to use an inverter. Typically they run off 12V car/boat batteries and invert the 12V to 120V. They are a lot cheaper than a generator. You can hook it up to a dedicated battery on the deck or you can use the boat’s battery. (I’m not familiar with boat electrical systems but if they incorporate an alternator to recharge the battery while running, you may be better off using that.) Then you can again use whatever tool you already have and there is no noise generated from the inverter.
    Here’s a link for that.
    https://www.harborfreight.com/750-watt-continuous-1500-watt-peak-power-inverter-66817.html

    OK, these are Harbor Freight items, but you can certainly get them from other sources. These were just convenient to search.

  • #4826
    Michael Luciano
    Michael Luciano
    Participant

    If you use an inverter, be careful. The car power outlet may be large enough,wattage, and the ac form is not a perfect sine wave. The sander motor may not be capable of handling the ripple,that is distortion, in the ac.

  • #4827

    Daryl Rosenblatt
    Participant

    I realized I didn’t complete my thought on the pneumatic version. The problem is you do need a pretty powerful compressor. The plus side is you can run hundreds of feet of pneumatic hose since, once the compressor is on, the hose is just another storage tank for the air. See if it’s economically worth renting the equipment, the sander itself should be cheaper than an electric version. The hoses will be more than the sander.

  • #4828

    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    That’s a very good point, Mike. But many of the newer inverters provide “clean” power. Even this cheap version from HF has proven trustworthy. A buddy of mine uses it for a buffing wheel to polish his car. No problems. If you’re nervous, I would test it on a cheaper tool first. I think the risky spot in this would a variable speed switch where the electronics might “see” the waveform. But again, I’ve only heard good things.

  • #4829

    Daryl Rosenblatt
    Participant

    If you are using a car or boat battery, the problem might not be what the battery can produce, but what the fuse (and I think most cars and boats still use fuses) can handle. I found that out the hard way. What it’s rated, and what a constant outside load are can be two separate things.

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