Joe Bottigliere

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Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 97 total)
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  • in reply to: How you doin'? #7713
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Robert,
    I’m guessing you want to remove the jaw so you could work on it or replace the screw. It sounds like the screw may just be worn down from years of use. Even metal screw vises experience that especially if allowed to cant or twist while clamping.
    That appendage sticking down in that top photo should carefully be removed. That, I believe, what retains the screw in the jaw but allows it to rotate in the nut. (The proper name escapes me.) The entire jaw with screw should simply unscrew from the bench unless there is a retainer on the end of the screw which would stop the user from accidentally pulling the jaw out. This may be a simple little piece with a slot which engages a chase on the threaded shaft.
    Hope that helps.

  • in reply to: How you doin'? #7689
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    That’s quick. You’re gonna love it! I really don’t see any of the disadvantages people complain about. Some say it’s harder to feed or you have to feed slower or take a smaller cut. I have always tended to take it easy on my machines so light cuts (1/32 – 1/16) were typical on my jointer. Even through the planer I am very conservative. The only drawback I have noticed – and this may not be accurate – is a slight decrease in the width of cut on my jointer. It’s appears to be a little under the 6″ I was getting with my conventional cutter head. But that’s minor in the scheme of things.
    On my Grizzly, the replacement was quick, easy, and required very little adjustment of the outfeed table. It has to be lowered completely for the process, but aligning it at TDC is straightforward and I have a stinky lever instead of a wheel. So, you should be golden.
    One problem may be replacing the bearings. They’re not always easy to get off and press on without an arbor press. Wish I could come over, drink your beer and help out in the process. Oh, well. Next machine upgrade.

  • in reply to: How you doin'? #7687
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Hey Rob,
    I got my cutter heads for the jointer and planer from MyWoodCutters.com. They included the bearings. I did go with a Luxcut III for these replacements. (Highly recommended.) I thought the price was right and very compatible with Grizzly. You might want to check them out despite the discount. I do have a Grizzly jointer, however. But these guys offered great customer service and the Luxcut was in stock. Just my two cents.

  • in reply to: How you doin'? #7676
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Great job, Daryl! Love it.

    You sound quite busy, Corey. Good thing no one is coming in to talk. You have no time to waste. Good luck. Keep it up!

  • in reply to: Favorite woods #7675
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    First off, what do you know about wine, Corey; are you old enough to drink? 🙂

    I mentioned walnut already. It works great with hand or power tools and carves nicely. When you get air dried stock, the colors are like a chocolate rainbow. And it looks fantastic with an oil (Watco) finish, wet sanded and waxed.

    My next favorites would be curly/quilted/figured maple. Under a dye with some shellac, it pops like a firecracker. The chatoyance is mesmerizing.

    Pine. What can I say? It’s traditional and ages to a warm patina like cherry does. And who can complain about its workability?

    Finally, I have to say I like poplar. Go ahead and snicker. I like the color – especially the dark greens. But I love the way it works under a plane. It can get fuzzy, but you can fix that. You can stain it, you can paint it or you can appreciate it for what it is. I’m also glad most people don’t like enough. It’s cheap.

  • in reply to: How you doin'? #7652
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Looking good, Rob. Can’t wait to see the finished job. Hopefully, in person. Nice wood choice, too. Walnut is probably my favorite to work with.

  • in reply to: Plywood shelves = art #7626
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Hey Charlie, maybe these aren’t shelves but a real fancy laundry basket. It appears the dirty clothes will gently fall to the rear of the carcass awaiting pickup. The smaller openings above the “shelves” are ventilation slots. See, now it has a purpose.

  • in reply to: Assessing a Used Delta Unisaw #7164
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    You know, Bob, transportation is always an issue with these larger machines. Depending on where the machine is currently and where it will end up is obviously going to dictate how much work is involved. Can you lift this onto a dolly and roll it to a rented or borrowed trailer? Will you simply roll off a trailer and into your garage? You get the picture. With asking price you mentioned for this, it may be worth hiring a professional moving team if there are lots of stairs involved. Alternately, the machine can be partially disassembled. Taking the cast iron top off will make a tremendous difference as will removing even the 10lb handles. Aligning a Unisaw top to the blade is a fairly easy process so don’t be shy in taking it apart.
    There are a lot of friendly members in this club. With enough notice, give a shout to them for help. You may be surprised just how many friends you have (especially if there’s a cold beer waiting for them afterwards). 🙂

  • in reply to: Assessing a Used Delta Unisaw #7153
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Bob,
    I meant to say, ASSESS not access for yourself.
    I should have mentioned that if there is cracked cast iron or chipped gears or really stiff movement in the controls (it may be a bent shaft), you will have to be honest with yourself if these are things you want to be bothered repairing or not. If you don’t want to spend the time and money, then walk away. The saw should not make any weird noises either. Mine doesn’t. Nor is there any excessive vibration while the machine is running. Again, it depends on what the asking price is.

  • in reply to: Assessing a Used Delta Unisaw #7152
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Although a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush, a good Unisaw may be worth three or four. It’s tough to say if it is worth it, however. It depends on what the price is and in what condition the machine is in as well as its age. Though they are known to be reliable, motors do get old and can break down. The Unisaw is a great machine. They typically have 3 HP motors and are reliable. They are good, solid, heavy machines that will stay tuned up indefinitely. I have not had to readjust mine since I first set it up almost 20 yrs. ago! This saw can last you a lifetime.

    You first want to make sure you have a fence, throat plate and preferably splitter and blade guard (though, those last two are negotiable). You want to look out for any cracked cast iron and extensive rust. Little rust can be easily cleaned and make for a good bargain. Try all the adjustments making sure the blade rises and retracts smoothly (or fairly). The gearing may only need a good cleaning. Check “under the hood” for dust build up. It is to be expected and may be the only reason things stick; again, a good reason for a bargain. Check the belts. Depending on the model, there should be three. They should be in decent shape but they are minor fixes. Ask for a straight edge and check to see that the table is flat. If it’s not – walk away. If there is any warp or severe dips, you will never be happy and it is probably the most costly part of the saw. Don’t worry about extension tables. They are cheap and easy to build. Make sure the fence is quality (Unifence, Beismier or some other quality aftermarket). You will have to access for yourself if any of the issues are repairable. Don’t let rust scare you or worn belts or scratched paint. If it is set up for 220V (as it should be) don’t be afraid. You can easily run a line in your shop or convert it back to 110V if necessary.
    But don’t just jump on it. You don’t want to jerry rig things to make the saw work. It’s not worth it. There are always sales to be had if you are patient. Finally, remember that a good price is whatever you are willing to pay for it. Good luck and enjoy.
    (Now a shameless plug. I have a Delta tenoning jig for sale if you are interested.)

Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 97 total)