Joe Bottigliere

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Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 97 total)
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  • in reply to: Nice video #8078
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Nice job Andrew. Looks like a Bench Crafted design. Yes? Did you apply a finish?

  • in reply to: New Topic #8022
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Oh brother! I think I’ll take up fishing.

  • in reply to: Thickness Planer Wanted #7952
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    There were a couple of members with connections to guys selling planers, Mike. I would look back on the forums about a month or so ago. Considering the current circumstances, they might still be available.

  • in reply to: Tip from Fine Woodworking #7912
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Nah! You gotta live on the edge and experience some excitement. I take several boxes of screws, without even looking at them and mix them together. Then, I just pick them, randomly, and install as needed. It’s exhilarating! Though, that could explain my finishing issues …

  • in reply to: Workbench Leg Repair #7864
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Bill,
    I know this comes after the fact and is of little help to you. But anyone else who may consider a similar build or technique should make note of this. Since no one else mentioned it, I think it worth pointing out. You should avoid wedging a tenon such that the forces will be perpendicular to the grain direction. That is, so that it forces the vertical grain apart like an axe. Had your wedges been located horizontally, you would not have split the grain. They could have at least been installed diagonally in the joint and still you could have avoided the split. Of course, that is not always practical and one should consider the location of the mortises. If it is far enough from an edge, or not very deep, the damage will be avoided. But these look pretty close to the edge of leg and they are designed to go all the way through. You did not mention it, but did you relieve the mortise walls to allow room for the displaced tenon or were the mortise walls just cut straight? I believe that also helps to relive the splitting effect of this technique.
    It’s obvious that the other legs were fine. But I think it is worth noting for those less aware of these pitfalls.
    For what it’s worth, my suggestion would be to inject some epoxy into the split and clamp it closed. (Of course do what you must to allow it to clamp closed.) Then reinforce it with dowels as Charlie recommends.
    Good luck!

  • in reply to: How you doin'? #7825
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    That would make it a “hall flower” project, no? Maybe it’s for little coats.

  • in reply to: Bandsaw purchase advice #7824
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Hey Bob. I have a Laguna 14/12 also. (It’s the smaller of the two versions.) It runs for about $1.1K and accepts up to 3/4″ blades. I am very happy with it. It has lots of great features like ceramic guides, all cast iron construction, cast wheels and trunnions, rack & pinion guide adj., 1-1/2hp motor – nothing flimsy about it. I’ve resawn some hard maple about 10″ wide and was quite pleased. (I think I could have used a sharper blade but the results were acceptable.) My only gripe is setting the guides. They require no tools but can be tricky to reach the lower guides. I’m not one for tilting the table to reach them. If you have extra fat fingers, it may be a problem. But it tracks perfectly. I also do not believe in blade drift. A saw should be set so there is no drift and this saw delivers that. The fence is always kept square tot he table and as long as the blade tracks in the middle of the wheels, it’s perfect.

  • in reply to: How you doin'? #7817
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Looks like I have a lot of catching up to do.
    Nice work as always, Charlie.
    Ben, are you actually planting a sycamore in your hall to hang coats? What am I missing … But we can all see where the real craftsmanship lies in that family. Keep him at it.
    Great bench, Andrew. I’ve been threatening to build mine for nearly a decade now. Much longer with this quarantine and I just might get the chance. In the meantime, I’ve been busy making a closet door out of knotty alder from Urban Specialty Hardwoods. Almost done. But working from home can take more time than it allows. I’ll get pictures when I can.

  • in reply to: Buying new bearings #7761
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    Rob, Mike offers a very practical solution. But if I remember right, you have a Delta? Why not go to Delta and order from them or at least look at the parts list? I know Grizzly provides replacement bearings for their machines by model number as well.
    Also note, that there is a difference in bearings. American made have an edge over the others. You pay a few dollars more but it’s well worth it.

  • in reply to: How you doin'? #7716
    Joe Bottigliere
    Joe Bottigliere
    Participant

    That sounds about right, Mike. I could not remember the terms. I’m still working on treen and foxing …
    I’ve seen vises where there is nothing more than a wooden wedge holding the screw to the jaw. I think, the split collar is used on the back end but I could be wrong. Regardless, I think you [Robert] get the idea. These things were made to be repaired. And if they were glued in, I bet they used hide glue so it could be disassembled.

    Mice engine, by the way. Did you restore it or is that purchased rebuilt?

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 97 total)